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Linux Mint 9: Installation Review – A Not-So-Happy Story August 16, 2010

Posted by NAyK in First Impressions, Linux, Linux Mint, Reviews, Windows, Working on Linux.
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Fed up with my buggy PCLinuxOS, I decided to install the new Linux Mint 9. After burning the installation DVD image (which is just over 700MB), I decided to install it on my Lenovo Thinkpad Z60m.

The loading process of the Live DVD was relatively smooth, though it felt a little slow to load the live image.  (PCinux is still faster in the Live CD department)

I then decided to install, and it asked for the customary questions like location, keyboard etc.

I liked the new look and feel, almost felt like openSUSE’s installation process in a good way.

At the partition table point, I found the graphics a little too small and the default processes difficult to understand.  I was anyway going to the advanced option, but PCLinux’s large view size of proposed partitioning table, seemed for once, more helpful.

I choose to delete my PCLinux partition and mounted all my other Windows partitions making sure I did not format those.

I was also asked whether I wanted to import any preferences from Windows like Firefox settings and  MyDocuments from Windows. First I checked it, and clicked ok. but then I changed my mind and went back to uncheck it. Please note that at this time there was no confirmation from Linux Mint on whether my options were going to be effective.

Only after all the options were listed, did Linux Mint begin the process of actually installing, which is customary.

While the installation was going on I noticed that the wifi was not detected, and I guess it was too late to look to change that, so I thought I’d fix it after the installation is done. I was hoping that Ubuntu’s spectacular record of being able to configure my internet connection in my desktop automatically would filter into the wireless connection as well.

The installation process took about 25 minutes, after which I rebooted. I noted that Linux Mint was the default operating system, and I wished that Mint had given me the option of choosing which operating system I wanted to default. I usually (curses upon me) still choose Windows as my default operating system.

Anyway, going into Linux Mint, I just couldn’t get the wifi to work. I noted that there were no windows wifi drivers installed, but because my wireless was not detected, no way for me to install them! I knew that I had to log into Windows to figure out the problem.

…when I returned to windows, to my shock (not horror, because I had backups), my entire My Documents folder had been erased. I had other folders in that partition, and they were ok, untouched (I hope) and working, but the MyDocuments was empty. This was shocking, especially since I had never experienced something like this with Linux before.

However, when I returned to windows, to my shock (not horror, because I had backups), my entire My Documents folder had been erased. I had other folders in that partition, and they were ok, untouched (I hope) and working, but the MyDocuments was empty. This was shocking, especially since I had never experienced something like this with Linux before. I forgot about trying to fix Linux Mint and went about restoring my documents using my backups (alas they were a few days old, so I lost some of the work I did over the weekend, but not much).

I am now quite disturbed and will probably in reaction do away with Linux Mint and … install some other operating system in my Laptop. However for my desktop I will still try to persevere with Mint to see whether this is a one-off problem or an actual bug.

So that’s my not-so-happy tale with Mint, hope others met with a better fate.

Comments»

1. tddrazul - August 17, 2010

I think if you look in the mirror you’ll discover where the problem lies. :-(

2. revdjenk - August 17, 2010

hmmm, ever try to install windows on a machine with another OS already installed…Windows writes over all your data … and apps … and OS! phhhhhht

3. NAyK - August 17, 2010

To tddrazul and revdjenk: thanks for your sympathy!!!

On normal circumstances, if you are careful, distros do not wipe out the data of other systems. Even Windows leaves Linux partitions alone (though it does take over the boot menu so that the grub to the linux distro needs to be rebuilt).

This is the first time I have lost something in Windows because of a Linux installation. I also am willing to concede that the mistake could be mine. Yet the only mistake I can perceive was that I checked the My Documents import feature, and then unchecked it again. I did not choose to format the partition, and it doesn’t explain why only one folder (particularly MyDocuments) was deleted.

So you (tddrazul/revdjenk) can enjoy your perfect Linux haven. My Linux space is still messy.

4. someone - August 17, 2010

Firefox search bar is integrated with mint search which redirects all ur searches to its mintified google search

No way to install ubuntu apps without warnings of unauthenticated, which is pathetic, when we know mint is built on top of ubuntu, it is an injustice to ubuntu

What about repository mirror options in apt? it directly pulls from ubuntu main mirror stressing it more and more

When ubuntu releases kernel updates, mint does not even show u that by default. It even warns u it is too dangerous

Sorry, I love mint and I hate it

5. RandyNose - August 17, 2010

That’s sucks, and is weird that you lost that data. I imported data from a Linux install and didn’t have anything end up missing.

6. CrazyHorse - November 3, 2010

Simply go to Start-Up Manager (in Mint, Ubuntu, etc) and select Windows as the default booter. You can change the timer (to choose), but don’t put less than 3 seconds if you have a slow computer..

To get rid of those extra boot options (and leave the two OS..)go into Synaptic and type Memtest. Mark the one that’s already installed for removal.

After, in terminal do “sudo update-grub”

And to get rid of recovery mode option in the bootloader,
in Terminal do: “cd /etc/default” then “gksudo gedit grub” or “gksudo leafpad grub” and scroll down to where it says: #GRUB_DISABLE_LINUX_RECOVERY=”true”
and remove the # sign. then save. and once again sudo update-grub. reboot and tada!


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